10 Office Products That Need to Be Replenished Frequently

Some office products can be bought once and last many years until they’re damaged, lost or become outdated. Others will require regular replenishment to maintain your stocks and ensure your office can function professionally and efficiently. Here are 10 such items that you may wish to include when placing your next office products order.

1. Sellotape may not be used that frequently in offices, but when it is required it tends to be with some urgency – such as reinforcing packaging that needs to be sent to a customer. For that reason, it’s always a good idea to keep a regular check to make sure somebody hasn’t used up the last reel.

2. Post it notes also tend to run out quickly, largely due to their overwhelming popularity amongst office staff. They’re great for messages, reminders and other notes, so make sure your staff have access to them as and when they’re needed.

3. A stapler may last a lifetime, but the staples won’t. They’re used for keeping important files together, both for internal and external use. If it’s been a while since you last checked your staples stock, do so before placing your next order.

4. Running out of paper when you need to print an important document, such as for a proposal or internal memo, could lead to an embarrassing situation. Ensuring you have plenty of printer paper is therefore very important. You may want to order more than just your standard A4 paper, too. Important documents that are going to clients and suppliers may need to be printed on high quality printer paper.

5. You’ll also need to make sure your printers have enough ink in them. This one can strike unexpectedly if regular checks do not take place, so it pays to have quite a few spares in the office products cupboard. However, make sure you’re keeping a close eye on what you have in reserve.

6. Printers aren’t the only machines that require ink. You should also check your photocopier to ensure that you have enough cartridges for it. Needing to run off several copies of important documents when the copier is out of ink can cause problems on a number of levels.

7. If your office sends a lot of postal correspondence, such as for posting out cheques or invoices, it will need a good supply of envelopes in order to make sure the finance and admin departments function properly.

8. Run out of office coffee and you’ll know about it soon enough. Staff will require the kitchen to be well-stocked with teas, coffee and milk, so when anything like this runs out, placing an order for replacements will be a top priority. Ideally, you’ll want to place your order when stocks are running low, rather than leaving it until your staff complain.

9. Pens go missing. A lot. And you never want to be in the embarrassing position of not having anything to write with. It’s a good idea to order lots of blue or black ink pens, as well as a few reds (as they always come in handy).

10. You’ll also need to make sure your staff have access to fresh writing pads for taking notes, brainstorming ideas and storing important information.

Electronic World – How We Use Electronics in Daily Life

Using electronics today is so much a part of our daily lives we hardly think of the way the world would be without electronics. Everything from cooking to music uses electronics or electronic components in some way. Our family car has many electronic components, as does our cooking stove, laptop and cell phone. Children and teenagers carry mobile phones with them everywhere and use them to take and send pictures, videos, and to play music. They send text messages on the cell phone to other phones and to their home computers.

Wireless internet is becoming more common all the time, with laptops set up in cyber cafes where people can drink coffee and check their email all at the same time. The computer user can do all the web searching in relative privacy thanks to the electronic accessories which can be added to the computer. Conversely, more and more transactions are being sent electronically across the airwaves so security is becoming a larger issue than ever before. Merchants who sell products online must be able to assure their customers that information submitted at a website is not being accessed by unauthorized personnel.

Music is a prime user of electronics, both in recording and in playback mode. Stereos, record players, tape decks, cassette players, CD drives and DVD players are all the result of advances in electronics technology in the last few decades. Today people can carry a playlist of hundreds of songs around with them easily in a very small device–easily portable. When you add Bluetooth or headphones the music can be heard by the user, but does not disturb those nearby.

Electronics technology in cameras has increased dramatically. A digital camera is available to most Americans at a price they can afford and cellphones often includes a fairly sophisticated digital camera that can capture still pictures or even video pictures and store them or transfer them to a computer where they can be saved, shared digitally with family or friends or printed out in hard form with a photo printer device. Pictures obtained through a camera or by means of a scanner can be edited, cropped, enhanced or enlarged easily through the marvel of electronics.

Literally thousands of everyday devices that we use constantly make use of electronics technology in order to operate. These are products ranging from automotive engines to automated equipment in production settings. Even artistic efforts benefit from computer modeling prior to the committing of valuable artistic media to create the finished product.

Electronics devices are being used in the health field, not only to assist in diagnosis and determination of medical problems, but to assist in the research that is providing treatment and cures for illnesses and even genetic anomalies. Equipment such as MRI, CAT and the older X-rays, tests for diabetes, cholesterol and other blood component tests all rely on electronics in order to do their work quickly and accurately. Pacemakers and similar equipment implanted in the body is now almost routine.

Overcoming Communication Barriers in Organizations

Although all communication is subject to misunderstandings, business communication is particularly difficult. The material is often complex and controversial. Moreover, both the sender and the receiver may face distractions that divert their attention. Further, the opportunities for feedback are often limited, making it difficult to correct misunderstandings. The following communication barriers in organizations and ways to overcome them will be the main topic of this article.

1. Information Overload. Too much information is as bad as too little because it reduces the audiences ability to concentrate effectively on the most important messages. People facing information overload sometimes try to cope by ignoring some of the messages, by delaying responses to messages they deem unimportant, by answering only parts of some messages, by responding inaccurately to certain messages, by taking less time with each message, or by reacting only superficially to all messages.

To overcome information overload, realize that some information is not necessary, and make necessary information easily available. Give information meaning rather than just passing it on, and set priorities for dealing with the information flow. Some information isn’t necessary.

2. Message Complexity. When formulating business messages, you communicate both as an individual and as representative of an organization. Thus you must adjust your own ideas and style so that they are acceptable to your employer. In fact, you may be asked occasionally to write or say something that you disagree with personally. Suppose you work as a recruiter for your firm. You’ve interviewed a job candidate you believe would make an excellent employee, but others in the firm have rejected this applicant. Now you have to write a letter turning down the candidate: You must communicate your firms message, regardless of your personal feelings, a task some communicators find difficult.

To overcome the barriers of complex messages, keep them clear and easy to understand. Use strong organization, guide readers by telling them what to expect, use concrete and specific language, and stick to the point. Be sure to ask for feedback so that you can clarify and improve your message.

3. Message Competition. Communicators are often faced with messages that compete for attention. If you’re talking on the phone while scanning a report, both messages are apt to get short shrift. Even your own messages may have to compete with a variety of interruptions: The phone rings every five minutes, people intrude, meetings are called, and crises arise. In short, your messages rarely have the benefit on the receivers undivided attention.

To overcome competition barriers, avoid making demands on a receiver who doesn’t have the time to pay careful attention to your message. Make written messages visually appealing and easy to understand, and try to deliver them when your receiver has time to read them. Oral messages are most effective when you can speak directly to your receiver (rather than to intermediaries or answering machines). Also, be sure to set aside enough time for important messages that you receive. Business messages rarely have the benefit of the audiences full and undivided attention.

4. Differing Status. Employees of low status may be overly cautious when sending messages to managers and may talk only about subjects they think the manager is interested in. Similarly, higher-status people may distort messages by refusing to discuss anything that would tend to undermine their authority in the organization. Moreover, belonging to a particular department or being responsible for a particular task can narrow your point of view so that it differs from the attitudes, values, and expectations of people who belong to other departments or who are responsible for other tasks.

To overcome status barriers, keep managers and colleagues well informed. Encourage lower-status employees to keep you informed by being fair-minded and respectful of their opinions. When you have information that you’re afraid you boss might not like, be brave and convey it anyway. Status barriers can be overcome by a willingness to give and receive bad news.

5. Lack of Trust, Building trust is a difficult problem. Other organization members don’t know whether you’ll respond in a supportive or responsible way, so trusting can be risky. Without trust, however, free and open communication is effectively blocked, threatening the organization’s stability. Just being clear in your communication is not enough.

To overcome trust barriers, be visible and accessible. Don’t insulate yourself behind assistants or secretaries. Share key information with colleagues and employees, communicate honestly, and include employees in decision making. For communication to be successful, organizations must create an atmosphere of fairness and trust.

6. Inadequate Communication Structures. Organizational communication is effected by formal restrictions on who may communicate with whom and who is authorized to make decisions. Designing too few formal channels blocks effective communication. Strongly centralized organizations, especially those with a high degree of formalization, reduce communication capacity, and they decrease the tendency to communicate horizontally thus limiting the ability to coordinate activities and decisions. Tall organizations tend to provide too many vertical communication links, so messages become distorted as they move through the organization’s levels.

To overcome structural barriers, offer opportunities for communicating upward, downward, and horizontally (using such techniques as employee surveys, open-door policies, newsletters, memo, and task groups). Try to reduce hierarchical levels, increase coordination between departments, and encourage two-way communication.

7. Incorrect Choice of Medium. If you choose an inappropriate communication medium, your message can be distorted so that the intended meaning is blocked. You can select the most appropriate medium by matching your choice with the nature of the message and of the group or the individual who will receive it. Face-to-face communication is the richest medium because it is personal, it provides immediate feedback, it transmits information from both verbal and nonverbal cues, and it conveys the emotion behind the message. Telephones and other interactive electronic media aren’t as rich; although they allow immediate feedback, they don’t provide visual nonverbal cues such as facial expressions, eye contact and body movements. Written media can be personalized through addressed memos, letters, and reports, but they lack the immediate feedback and the visual and vocal nonverbal cues that contribute to the meaning of the message. The leanest media are generally impersonal written messages such as bulletins, fliers, and standard reports. Not only do they lack the ability to transmit nonverbal cues and to give feedback, they also eliminate any personal focus.

To overcome media barriers, choose the richest media for no routine, complex message. Use rich media to extend and to humanize your presence throughout the organization, to communicate caring and personal interest to employees, and to gain employee commitment to organizational goals. Use leaner media to communicate simple, routine messages. You can send information such as statistics, facts, figures and conclusions through a note, memo or written report

8. Closed communication climate. Communication climate is influenced by management style, and a directive, authoritarian style blocks the free and open exchange of information that characterizes good communication.

To overcome climate barriers, spend more time listening than issuing orders.

9. Unethical Communication. An organization cannot create illegal or unethical messages and still be credible or successful in the long run. Relationships within and outside the organization depend or trust and fairness.

To overcome ethics barriers, make sure your messages include all the information that ought to be there. Make sure that information is adequate and relevant to the situation. And make sure your message is completely truthful, not deceptive in any way.

10. Inefficient Communication. Producing worthless messages wastes time and resources, and it contributes to the information overload already mentioned.

Reduce the number of messages by thinking twice before sending one. Then speed up the process, first, by preparing messages correctly the first time around and, second, by standardizing format and material when appropriate. Be clear about the writing assignments you accept as well as the ones you assign.

11. Physical distractions. Communication barriers are often physical: bad connections, poor acoustics, illegible copy. Although noise or this sort seems trivial, it can completely block an otherwise effective message. Your receiver might also be distracted by an uncomfortable chair, poor lighting, or some other irritating condition. In some cases, the barrier may be related to the receiver’s health. Hearing or visual impairment or even a headache can interfere with reception of a message. These annoyances don’t generally block communication entirely, but they may reduce the receiver’s concentration.

To overcome physical distractions, try to prepare well written documents which are clear, concise, and comprehensive. When preparing oral presentations try to find a setting which permits audience to see and hear the speaker clearly.

Career Tips in Commercial Real Estate Brokerage

The commercial real estate sales industry can be very rewarding to brokers and agents. That being said it requires focus and consistent effort if you are to reap real rewards and become a top agent.

Many salespeople join the industry with the hope that ‘things just start to happen’ as part of working for an agency or brokerage; unfortunately those salespeople do not last very long at all. After 6 months or so the reality of the market ‘kicks in’ with few if any commissions coming in.

It takes about 3 months of real effort to change your personal market conditions and your income. It is not a stop and start process. Things should happen to a plan and that will be a plan that you implement every day.

The agency or brokerage that you work for has little to do with the listings and clients that you create or serve. When you start working in the industry, start working hard on your commitment to personal success and progress. You will need a business plan or something similar that keeps you on task.

So what do you need to make the industry work for you? Try these for starters:

  • A good database that you keep up to date in all respects
  • A list of prospects and clients in your database that you can talk to in a continual way
  • Market knowledge and skills relating to your specialist property type
  • Sound and established negotiation skills for listing, inspections, marketing and negotiation
  • Excellent documentation skills relating to your property type, contracts, leases, and any other supplementary documentation
  • Personal drive and a passion for prospecting and selling
  • Excellent marketing skills in both direct, and indirect marketing
  • Communication skills that are advanced for the complexities of property sale, leasing, negotiating and closing.
  • Good time management and documentation processes that allow you to start the day early with momentum and results.
  • Targets and goals that you can track.
  • Exclusive listings that you control for your clients.
  • Referral opportunities with established clients and prospects.
  • Clients that trust you and your skills to help them resolve property problems.

To give momentum to these things it requires deliberate effort. Every agent or broker has plenty of opportunity to rise up in the ranks of the market. The key to making it happen is ‘personal activity and planning’.

It should always be remembered that the commercial real estate industry and market is under change. As brokers and agents we should adjust to market conditions and not wait for the market to come to us.